FIGHTING THE #1 CAUSE
OF MATERNAL DEATH

Every day, nearly 200 women around the world die from bleeding complications after childbirth, also known as postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Most deaths due to PPH are preventable, yet it is still a major contributor to the leading, direct cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Annually, 14 million women suffer from PPH - and of these some 70,000 women do not survive.

This is why we funded and supported the largest clinical trial conducted in PPH prevention, led by the World Health Organization (WHO), and involving nearly 30,000 women from 10 countries.

How can we beat the heat?

The current medicinal treatment standard for PPH prevention degrades in hot temperatures, yet in many parts of the world, reliable access to electricity and refrigeration is inconsistent, thus jeopardizing the quality of the medicine.

What steps are being taken?

Merck for Mothers, Ferring Pharmaceuticals, and the WHO, through a public private-private collaboration, are working together to tackle this global health issue. The collaboration began when Merck for Mothers approached Ferring and the WHO about studying an investigational medicine, and has resulted in the largest clinical trial conducted in PPH, involving nearly 30,000 women from 10 countries in the developing world.

Together with Ferring and WHO, we will continue to work towards our goal of helping address the significant burden presented by PPH. We are committed to increasing access to affordable and sustainable treatment for the public sector in countries that suffer from the highest burdens of maternal mortality.

PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES

Argentina, Egypt, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Singapore,
South Africa, Thailand, Uganda, and the United Kingdom.

As we continue to develop this life-saving medicine, we will work together to ensure that, once its effectiveness has been established and approved by the appropriate regulatory bodies, it is available at an affordable and sustainable price, and accessible to countries that suffer from the highest burdens of maternal mortality.